FUZZY SPOT,  March 2001, Lynx

Lynx is a non-obvious string of stars running between Ursa Major and Auriga/Gemini.  The brightest star, alpha, is only 3rd magnitude.  Lying out of the Milky Way, this constellation is dominated by galaxies.  However there is a faint planetary nebula, and a very distant globular cluster.  Known as the Intergalactic Wanderer, there continues to be disagreement as to whether or not this globular is a member of the Milky Way.

I only have 4 observations of objects in this constellation (NGC 2419, 2683, 2782, and 2844), all in the 10" scope.  All other observations are taken from the Night Sky Observer's Guide (George Robert Kepple and Glenn W. Sanner, Willmann-Bell, INC.) and are in quotes.

        NGC 2419  (07h38.1 +38 53) This globular cluster is known as the Intergalactic Wanderer.  I saw it as a  fuzzy spot, quite bright round, a little brighter in middle, and no stars or granularity.  There is a very bright star next to it and a nice double past the bright star.  Increasing the magnification to 170X or 240X shows no stars resolved or granularity.

        NGC 2500 (08h01.9 +50 45) "12/14 inch scopes - 125X:  NGC 2500 is a diffuse, circular 2' glow without much central brightening.  The galaxy lies just south of a loose sprinkling of ten faint stars.  Three more stars are to the north.  A faint star nearly touches the ESE tip."

        NGC 2541 (08h14.7 +49 04) "16/18 inch scopes - 150X:  NGC 2541 has a rather low surface brightness 3' x 2' NNW/SSE halo with an oval-shaped core and a faint nonstellar nucleus.  An 11th magnitude star lies 4.5' NNE and a 12th magnitude star 3' SW."

        NGC 2552 (08h19.3 +50 00) "12/14 inch scopes - 125x:  NGC 2552 is a very faint, amorphous glow about 2' across.  A 12th magnitude star lies 3' NE."

        NGC 2683 (08h52.7 +33 25) This is a real beautiful elongated galaxy.  I saw it as pretty bright, pretty large, and very elongated ENE/WSW.  It is brighter in the middle, but no nucleus was seen.  The middle definitely bulges.  Using averted vision extends the halo somewhat.  An occasional star was seen near the middle, but I don't believe it is the nucleus.  There is also a star on ENE of the halo.  A possible dust lane on S side was seen.  A fantastic object, worthy of belonging in the SAC's 110 Best of the NGC.

        NGC 2782 (09h14.1 +40 07) This galaxy is pretty faint, somewhat small, slightly brighter in the middle, and contains a stellar nucleus.  The elongation is uncertain, perhaps slightly E/W.  To the SW of the galaxy is 2 stars.  There are no stars involved with the galaxy.  Just not much here.

        NGC 2793 (09h16.8 +34 26) "8/10 inch scopes - 100x:  NGC 2793, 1 degree west of magnitude 3.1 Alpha = 40 Lyncis, is a tiny galaxy contained in a diamond-shaped asterism of 10th magnitude stars, the star at the diamond's northern vertex a 15'' NNE-SSW double.  The galaxy's halo appears round and is uniform in surface brightness."

        NGC 2832 (09h19.7 +33 46) "8/10 inch scopes - 125x:  NGC 2832 is the brightest object in the Abell 779 galaxy group 1 degree SW of magnitude 3.1 Alpha = 40 Lyncis.  It appears fairly faint, about 1' in diameter, and slightly brighter toward the center.  Approximately 3' to its east and SSE are two double stars, the former a coarse pair of 11th magnitude stars and the latter magnitude 10 and 11.5 stars only 10'' apart."

        NGC 2844 (09h21.8 +40 10) Here is a galaxy which is somewhat small, pretty faint, a little brighter in the middle, and shows an occasional nucleus.  It forms a flattened triangle with 2 bright stars which do interfere with the viewing.  Use averted vision on this object to get the most out of it.

        PK 164+31.1 (07h57.8 +53 25 01) "12/14 inch scopes - 125x:  This huge planetary, 5' ENE of a magnitude 12.5 star, has such low surface brightness that it requires a UHC filter to be seen at all.  Its halo is diffuse, and only irregularly brighter toward the center.  Several faint stars are embedded in it."

Herschel 400 Objects
2419, 2683, 2782
SAC’s 110 Best of the NGC Objects
2683


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